Office on Women's Health Blog

Jay Ell Alexander

Getting More Exercise and Why It’s Worth It

Jay Ell Alexander

Starting and maintaining a health routine can be hard. I lived it — I know! I have sizes in my closet ranging from 10 to 16 to prove it.

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Breast Pumps and Insurance Coverage: What You Need To Know

Dr. Nancy C. Lee

We've got the information you're searching for about breast pumps and insurance coverage.

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It's On Us Logo with Dr. Nancy C. Lee

It's On Us

Dr. Nancy C. Lee

Today, I took a pledge to help end sexual assault on college campuses. As a woman, mother and the Director of the Office on Women's Health, this is a deeply personal issue for me. Before I ask you to join me in taking this pledge, here are the facts.

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hands grasping each other

Suicide Is on My Mind

Kimberly Konkel

I'm a survivor of suicide. For me, that means that I've attempted to end my life by suicide and survived the death of my aunt who ended her life with a gun.

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Marine Wong

An Interview About Healthy Aging: Marine Wong

As much as we might want to deny it, we know that aging is a natural part of life. But aging doesn't have to mean poor health or a loss of independence. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle will help you stay active, healthy, and productive! And it's never too late to start taking steps to improve your wellbeing. Just ask Marine Wong. After her granddaughter was born, Marine decided she wanted to be healthier. Read our interview with Marine to learn her tips for healthy aging.

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Make Work and Breastfeeding Work For You

Dr. Nancy C. Lee

While many businesses want to provide time and space for nursing moms, it's not always easy for them to figure out how. Now that many employers are required by law to provide reasonable accommodations for employees who breastfeed, it's even more important to help companies think creatively about solutions.

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College: A New State of Mind

Esther Lee

Last summer, before my first year of college, I tried my best to prepare for a healthy daily lifestyle. I researched nutritious meals and snacks, created an exercise routine, and committed myself to avoiding all-nighters. However, it wasn't until I arrived that I realized that I may have been physically ready to take on the college life, but I was caught off-guard by the mental and emotional challenges.

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5 Ways To Make Breastfeeding Easier After Maternity Leave Is Over

Dr. Nancy C. Lee

What's one of the biggest hurdles mothers face when breastfeeding? Returning to work. If you're pregnant or recently gave birth and you want to continue breastfeeding after you go back to work, here are five things that will make it easier

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Get the Support You Need To Make Breastfeeding Work

Dr. Nancy C. Lee

Motherhood is full of choices, and one of the first decisions to make is how you're going to feed your baby. The choice between breastfeeding and formula feeding is a personal one. My choice was to breastfeed, and I quickly learned why they call breastfeeding a journey.

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I'm Covered Stories: For This 26-er, Getting Insured Was a "No-brainer"

Judy Sarasohn

Although Amanda Waddle comes heavily padded when she takes to the ice for her hockey league, that doesn't mean she can't get hurt. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, Amanda was one of the more than 3 million young adults who were able to be covered by their parents' health insurance plans. But when she aged off her parent's plan on her 26th birthday last November, going without coverage wasn't an option she was willing to consider.

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Rebecca Flores

An Interview About Pumping at Work: Rebecca Flores

Breastfeeding mothers need support from employers to continue breastfeeding after returning to work. Pumping at work allows moms to give their best to their baby without jeopardizing their jobs. Businesses benefit, too: Breastfed babies are healthier, meaning lower health care costs for employers and fewer days out for moms. Allowing pumping at work also decreases turnover rates and increases employee productivity and loyalty. This was true for Rebecca Flores, a mother of two. Unable to breastfeed her first child for very long, she knew she wanted to prioritize breastfeeding with her second child. To succeed, she'd need to pump at work, but as an hourly worker in a department store, she wasn't sure about her options. Thanks to the federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers law, Rebecca's employer was required to provide time and a place, other than a bathroom, for her to pump. Read our interview with Rebecca to learn how her employer met her needs, enabling Rebecca to continue breastfeeding her child after going back to work.

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