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Specific phobias

A specific phobia is a strong, irrational fear of something that poses little or no actual danger. Some of the more common specific phobias are:

  • Closed-in places
  • Heights
  • Escalators
  • Tunnels
  • Highway driving
  • Water
  • Flying
  • Dogs
  • Injuries involving blood

Such phobias aren't just extreme fear; they are irrational fear of a particular thing. You may be able to ski the world's tallest mountains with ease but be unable to go above the fifth floor of an office building. While adults with phobias realize that these fears are irrational, they often find that facing, or even thinking about facing, the feared object or situation brings on a panic attack or severe anxiety.

Specific phobias affect an estimated 19.2 million adult Americans and are twice as common in women as men. They usually appear in childhood or adolescence and tend to persist into adulthood. The causes of specific phobias are not well understood, but there is some evidence that the tendency to develop them may run in families.

If the feared situation or feared object is easy to avoid, people with specific phobias may not seek help. Treatment is needed if the phobia hurts a person's career or personal life.

Treatment

If you think you have an anxiety disorder such as specific phobia, the first person you should see is your family doctor. A physician can determine whether the symptoms that alarm you are due to an anxiety disorder, another medical condition, or both.

Specific phobias respond very well to carefully targeted psychotherapy.

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Content last updated March 29, 2010.

Resources last updated March 29, 2010.

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