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Preventing HIV infection

a man and a woman walking outside while holding hands and talking

Thirty years have passed since the first case of HIV in the United States. Today, we know many ways to prevent HIV. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy is the U.S. government's new plan for improving HIV care and prevention. And under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act  (health care reform), it is easier for people who do have HIV/AIDS to pay for the care they need.

Here, President Barack Obama announces the national strategy and talks about the country's plan to prevent the spread of HIV and help people living with HIV/AIDS:

If you think you've been exposed to HIV

Go to the doctor immediately. Your doctor may decide to put you on HIV drugs to lower the chances of you getting HIV. But the drugs only work if you start them within 48 to 72 hours after you're exposed to HIV.
Government in action

Read what the Department of Health and Human Services  (PDF, 613 KB) is doing to support the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.
National HIV/AIDS Strategy

National HIV/AIDS strategy

Most women get HIV from having sex with a man who is HIV-positive. The second main way they get HIV is through sharing needles used for injecting drugs. Abstaining from sex — not having sex of any kind — is the only sure way to prevent sexually transmitted HIV infection. But you can also practice safer sex to greatly reduce your chance of getting HIV. Follow these links to learn more about safer sex and about other ways to prevent HIV infection in yourself and others.

Content last updated: July 01, 2011.

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